Temporary injunction dismissed by court: the wolf hunt in Norway continues | WWF Norway

Temporary injunction dismissed by court: the wolf hunt in Norway continues



Posted on 05 January 2018
Today the Oslo District Court dismissed a temporary injunction filed by WWF-Norway in order to stop this winter´s wolf hunt. The dismissal means that the hunt continues. A total 42 wolves can be shot this winter, which is 75 percent of the wolves residing in Norway.
© Erik Frøystein
Today the Oslo District Court dismissed a temporary injunction filed by WWF-Norway in order to stop this winter´s wolf hunt. The dismissal means that the hunt continues.

A total 42 wolves can be shot this winter, which is 75 percent of the wolves residing in Norway. So far a total 13 wolves have been culled. – Heartbreaking and totally unacceptable, said Ingrid Lomelde, Policy Director at WWF-Norway.

It was last month that WWF-Norway for the second time sued the Norwegian state for making unlawful wolf culling decisions. At the same time the organization asked for a temporary injunction of the wolf hunt both inside and outside the wolf zone.

– Today´s decision by the district court means that we will not be able to stop the hunt while we wait for the actual lawsuit. We are very disappointed that we are not able to prevent the most extensive wolf hunt since the wolf became a protected species in Norway in 1973. Basically all wolf hunting is forbidden in this country, it is only under very special circumstances that hunting can be allowed in order to prevent damage. The wolves that are now being hunted have not caused any damage, and they live in geographic areas prioritised for large carnivore. There is no god argument as to why the hunt should take place without waiting for the courts to decide whether the culling decisions are according to law or not, said Lomelde.

WWF-Norway will now, together with its lawyers, analyse the verdict - which will be appealed.

– We also hope that the trial itself will take place as soon as possible so that we can get a judicial decision on whether or not the Norwegian wolf management is according to law or not, said Lomelde.

The wolf is a critically endangered species in Norway, classified as being near the brink of extinction.

– The wolf naturally belongs in Norway. It has, as other large carnivore, an important role to play in our nature. As such, it is unbearable that Norway has decided to use the wolf population goal as a maximum limit for how many wolves we should have – seeing that this is keeping the population at a critically endangered level.

Lomelde also pointed out that today´s court decision seems to accept that Norway relinquishes its responsibility for critically endangered species as long as our neighbouring countries are working to take care of them.

– In the management of other species, we take responsibility for other animals that are critically endangered in Norway even though they are not endangered in other countries. It would be a sensational change of Norwegian nature management if other conditions should apply for the wolf.
 
Today the Oslo District Court dismissed a temporary injunction filed by WWF-Norway in order to stop this winter´s wolf hunt. The dismissal means that the hunt continues. A total 42 wolves can be shot this winter, which is 75 percent of the wolves residing in Norway.
© Erik Frøystein Enlarge
Ingrid Lomelde, Policy Director at WWF-Norway.
© WWF Verdens naturfond/Ivan Tostrup Enlarge